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“A Game of Thrones” – G. R. R. Martin

This is a review of “A Game of Thrones” the first book of the series “A Song of Ice and Fire” by George R. R. Martin.

In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. The cold is returning, and in the frozen wastes to the North of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom’s protective Wall. At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to. Sweeping from a land of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of plenty, here is a story of the fate of the Starks, their allies, and their enemies as each endeavors to win that deadliest of conflicts: the game of thrones.

Short chapters makes it easy to read about characters that aren’t as likeable. It also makes it easier to read in general, and to find good places for a break. Information is given in short bursts, and there is a whole lot of information. The world building is deep and thorough. The scenery is varied and expertly described, populated by peasants and royals, and it feels real even if most of the focus is, obviously, on the royals and the people immediately around them.

It is impossible to mention every character we were introduced to in this book. Suffice to say that everyone is a hero in their own mind, and a villain in someone else’s. The ever changing duality of human nature, and the way humans are fallible and so very liable to ignore things that make us uncomfortable. Some people are too trusting, others too proud, too impatient, too patient, too honest, too honorable. The brashness of youth, the naivete, the painful journey intro adulthood, the loss of family, and the way a life can change in a single day, with a single act.

Unlike some other books, every action has a reaction and it is simply a picture of humanity in all its horrible, terrible, wonderful, beautiful violent glory.

Despite the sheer amount of characters that we follow through the story – both main and secondary – the story never feels bogged down. One never feels like it stops up, like we are re-reading the same day over and over again. The story always pushes forwards at a good pace, and something that happened in one chapter is never showed in another chapter from someone else’s point of view. They might mention it, talk about it, but we as readers never have to re-read it. That is part of what makes the story move on, along with short and concise sentences. There is no flowery language to suffer through here, and the creeping realisation and the discovery of the Others/White Walkers is perfectly sprinkled throughout the story.

Concerning bad things about this book, there are none. There is absolutely nothing that I hated about this book. There are, however, things that I found mildly irritating.

There are a lot of people to keep track of, both main characters and especially the people around them. Yes, it adds realism to the world, it makes it seem populated and grand, but it can be overwhelming and confusing. The charts in the back of the book barely give a hint of what family swears fealty to what house, not who is who, nor do they show any marriages or children. It made it for an overwhelming amount of guess-work as to why such and such should follow the Lannisters or the Starks when their family is actually affiliated with the enemy house according to the appendices.

Younger girls react to boys/men in two ways: either they are scared or they fall for them so hard they almost worship at their feet. Arya Stark is the only exception to this, but she’s written more or less as a boy herself so it almost doesn’t count. Where are the girls who don’t give a fig or aren’t impressed by a fine face? I do miss them in this book. This is a bit annoying, but not overwhelmingly so, but what did bother me a bit more was Daenerys’s quick change of mind concerning Drogo and her relationship. She goes from being terrified and from sex hurting, to liking it and taking charge. In one single chapter. It was a bit too quick, and it would have been far better served to have another chapter covering that progress better. Otherwise it tastes a bit too much of the Stockholm Syndrome.

There was a scene with Tyrion Lannister revealing what seems like a bit too much about his past at a bit too awkward point in the story, but that is also quite a minor thing.

Amazingly enough there wasn’t a single character that I truly hated or even disliked. Sansa was irritating through most of the book, and Jon was a bit annoying with his angst, but it was hardly worth mentioning. The story itself was so strong and powerful that I hardly noticed it, and I didn’t even mind the politicking going around – and usually politics-heavy books aren’t my cup of tea at all. I am definitely going to continue reading this series even if I feel like I need a break between the books so that my cup doesn’t runneth over.

I definitely recommend this series!

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Posted by on April 17, 2018 in Books

 

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