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Category Archives: Sci-Fi

“Vampire Hunter D: Raiser of Gales” – H. Kikuchi

This is a review of “Raiser of Gales” the second book in the Vampire Hunter D series by Hideyuki Kikuchi.

The review of the first book can be found here.

The village of Tepes lies in the shadow of a Nobility castle, but the Nobility is long gone. Or so it appears until four children disappear, only for three to return with no memory of what happened. Ten years later vampires who can walk in daylight have appeared, and are terrorising the villagers. Only the vampire hunter known as D can solve the mystery… but the answer may be more horrible than anyone can imagine.

Learning more about this weird wild west sci-fi world was fascinating. The plot was good, and though it was a bit obvious what had to have happened to the one child that never returned, it was less clear what had happened to the three that did. Not to mention that their final fate – though a bit disappointing after the build-up – was a complete surprise. There was also a tiny epilogue with a very nice touch about one of the minor characters, Marco.

It was excellent to find it out more about D and his ancestry, and also for hints as to why he does what he does. Only hints were revealed in the story, leaving a lot of mystery surrounding D, and that is an excellent reason to continue reading the other books. The author is very good at scattering hints and information about his main character.

The cruelty of the Nobility gains a deeper level other than just keeping humans as food or slaves. The sheer callousness of the experiments performed on countless children and grown humans, and then the failsafe that activated ten years after the experiment was over and it was obvious that it had failed, was chilling. It makes the Nobility more horrifying, and it’s more understandable why humans are so terrified of them beyond even the possibility of being turned into a vampire.

The writing is better all over, and there are far fewer mistakes in this story. It could be because the author has learned in the two years between the first (1983) and second book (1985). Or it could be because the translator is getting better – or it could be (and most likely is) both of those at the same time.

There are no more info-dump paragraphs of world history like in the first book. Now everything is vital to the story, and the paragraphs of information are shorter and more concise. However, Kikuchi hasn’t suddenly become perfect at his craft, and there are still some bad things about this book.

It was not fun to learn that Lina wasn’t being smart on her own merits, but made smart by whatever it was that the Nobility did to her years before. She was a strong female character, but this revelation kind of ruined her entire character. The same with her sudden change into someone willing too have sex with the other three people who had been kidnapped – although that could have been due to the Nobility’s tampering.

There is a sudden change in the personality of one of the characters. The Mayor suddenly being all obsessive about Lina, and forcing himself on her. When did that start? There were no hints of it up until it happened, and that was a bit too much. The author also has a tendency to make most of his male characters rough and very eager for sex. Yes, they live in a difficult world and the Nobility has managed to eradicate all possible disease brought on by inbreeding or STDs, but not everyone who is shown needs to be a sex obsessed and disgusting bad guy.

In general the fact that most characters who are turned into vampires suddenly become very promiscuous is a bit weird. The change is very abrupt and it happens right after the bite/the character being turned into a vampire. No grace period whatsoever. Very few humans who get changed aren’t suddenly focused on sex, and neither are (most) born Nobility and D himself. At least both men and women go a bit crazy when they get turned, so it’s an equal opportunity thing.

Despite this, the story was very good and fascinating, and I am eager to begin the next book in the series.

I recommend this book!

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“Vampire Hunter D” – H. Kikuchi

This is a review of “Vampire Hunter D” which is the first book of Hideyuki Kikuchi’s series about the dhampir D.

It is the year 12,090 A.D. The world has ended, ravaged in a firestorm of man’s wars and madness. Humanity managed to survive the calamity… but they are not alone. Doris Lang knew what her fate was the second the vampire Count Magnus Lee bit her – an agonizing transformation into one of the undead, to be hunted by her fellow villagers, or cursed to become the Count’s eternal bride and thirsting for human blood. There was only one chance, one hope for her: hiring a vampire hunter named D.

The world that is created in this book, is vast. It is complicated and has a lot of history, and there is a need for a good deal of infodumping in order to actually understand what is going on. There is not a single bit of infodumping that isn’t needed or tied to what will happen next, or later on in the book.

The characters in the book can surprise you. Doris and Larmica aren’t weak at all, and Dan is tough. The sheriff and the old doctor and all the people of the little town just do their best to survive in a rather hostile environment. Greco is a force of chaotic neutral who is allowed to be as bad as he wants to be, Rei-Ginsei is someone I would have loved to return in another book. The Count is a bit of a stereotype, but the sci-fi elements of the story help to lessen that considerably.

And as for D himself, he is made to be what we consider today as a Gary Stue, but he is so quiet in action and in speech that this isn’t as painfully obvious as one would think. Even if both Larmica and Doris fall for him instantly, he doesn’t pay either of them any attention, and he is even killed by Rei-Ginsei at one point. There is enough mystery around D to keep reading.

This was a book written all the way back in 1983, and storytelling was different then. This sort of omniscient author wasn’t rare, but at least Kikuchi actually gives us breaks in the infodumping and omniscience with sharp episodes of action and fun. The action scenes are very good, and one can see them happen like in a movie.

The storytelling was, well, not perfect at all. This could be either because the author wasn’t actually all that good, or the translator wasn’t quite up to the task, or a mix of both. Japanese can be a difficult language to translate if one isn’t used to it, so some turns of phrases didn’t quite work out. The author is also an omniscient storyteller with more telling than showing, and that can get a bit annoying.

While not perfect writing, the setting and the mystery surrounding D are very good. The book is also very short, so it doesn’t take long to read. I already have the next four books on order, eagerly waiting to get my hands on them.

I do recommend this!

 
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Posted by on February 26, 2019 in Action Adventure, Books, Fantasy, Sci-Fi

 

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